5 Ways to Add Value to Your Employer

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A while back, I wrote a post entitled, “Three Ways to Add Value to a Company Before Getting Hired.” It still is quite popular, in part because people are finding it when they Google “ways to add value to your company.” Due to this demand for adding value to your company when employed, I’ll give you a quick rundown of things you can do:

1) Do your job. OK, stop with the “Well, duh!” that you’re thinking (and you know you are). But really, how many times do we hear about folks who are getting in trouble because they are messing around on social media sites or talking too much or playing hooky from work instead of doing the stuff that they are being paid to do? Simply carrying out the duties of your job description will add value to your employer because they need someone to meet the customers’ needs, create reports, balance the books, etc. That’s why they hired you, after all. And it puts you ahead of your colleagues who are trying to find ways to do everything but work.

2) Every week, learn something new that could impact the company. It doesn’t have to be a huge thing; even reading an interesting article that pertains to your company’s biggest competitor could be enlightening. And then there’s also the more traditional learning that happens in universities, at conferences, and at seminars. As the saying goes, “Knowledge is power.” Learn more so you can strengthen your position as someone who knows about the latest trends in your industry.

3) Implement the new concepts you are learning. This is a common occurrence — you go to a conference, connect with contemporaries in other companies, learn lots of cool stuff, and make plans to change the existing practices. But, upon arrival at the office on Monday morning, you get totally overwhelmed by all the work that is piled on your desk. “I’ll get back to the conference when I get all this work out of the way,” you mutter. Problem is, there always seems to be more work. Be a part of that small percentage that can successfully enact the innovative concepts learned at training, and you will be adding a great deal of value to your company.

4) Go beyond the job description. Do you hear people at work say, “That’s not my job” when presented with a task that falls a bit outside their realm? Of course, you have. The thing is, not every scenario can be predicted, and sometimes work gets really busy. Going the extra mile to do something additional will give you exposure to a task that you may not have worked with before. Plus, it shows that you are focused on the needs of the company and its clients.

5) Become known as a problem solver. What do you do when situations crop up? Do you a) run to your boss asking, “What should I do?” or do you b) see if you can figure out a solution yourself? In general, your supervisor will be very happy to see you taking ownership of your position by working out problems. Of course, exercise some discretion — don’t take on issues that are way beyond the scope of your department or try to bluff your way through something you know nothing about.

What other ways do you add value to your employer?

Image courtesy of Brad Greenlee

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Comments

  1. I think most employers are grateful when employees show initiative but often, employers don’t actually tell their employees this! I truly believe that when staff are confident, they work extremely well.

    • Melissa Cooley
      Twitter: TheJobQuest
      says:

      Hi Beverly,

      Thanks for your comment! It definitely depends on the type of initiative that an employee shows and the culture of the organization regarding how much should be done to add value. If the employee keeps all factors of his/her specific situation in mind, adding value can be very easy to do.

      Melissa

  2. Thanks for this list – makes filling in my dev plan much easier. If only HR departments wrote their forms so you could tell what they are actually asking with vague questions like “What additional value can you bring to your current role?”

    • Melissa Cooley
      Twitter: TheJobQuest
      says:

      I’m glad you found this list helpful, John! When you reflect on what you have been doing, activities that can be categorized under any of these points will help with your answer, with points 4 and 5 being seen as going above and beyond.

      Good luck with your dev plan!

      Melissa

  3. Kenneth Drayton says:

    This is really a good list of ways to be more proactive on a job. Wish I preformed more of these tasks on my last job. But, now I’m sure that I’ll perform these duties on the next one.

    • Melissa Cooley
      Twitter: TheJobQuest
      says:

      Hi Kenneth,

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting! I’m glad that you found the list so helpful and hope that they benefit you and your employer.

      Melissa

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